South and West Wales Tides

Admiralty Easy Tide
South Wales Tide Prediction, Penarth Marina, Cardiff
West Wales Tide Prediction, Milford Haven, Pembroke
BBC Tide Prediction
South Wales Tide Prediction, Penarth Marina, Cardiff
West Wales Tide Prediction, Milford Haven, Pembroke

 

The water is deepest at High Water Springs and shallowest at Low Water Springs. Tidal currents are strongest at the Spring Tides.

The Bristol Channel (Welsh: Môr Hafren) is a major inlet in the island of Great Britain, separating South Wales from South West England and extending from the lower estuary of the River Severn (Afon Hafren) to that part of the North Atlantic Ocean known as the Celtic Sea (Môr Celtaidd).

The Bristol Channel has the second largest tidal range in the world and takes its name from the English city of Bristol.

Currents are strong with Spring rates of upto 8 knots in the vicinity of the Second Severn Crossing.

The Bristol Channel, on both the Welsh and English sides has more miles of Heritage Coast seaboard than any other stretch of water in the U.K. Its over 30 miles (50km) across at its widest point.

Bristol Channel Tsunami 1607: On 30 January 1607, thousands of people were drowned, houses and villages swept away, farmland inundated and flocks destroyed when a flood hit the shores of the bristol channel. The devastation was particularly bad on the Welsh side in the Newport and Chepstow.